As part of Rural Assistance Nepal, a not-for-profit charity organization that looks to advance education and assist with healthcare in the rural areas of Nepal, Middletown native Jesse Riggin and his longtime friend, John, will spend three weeks in the villages of Pyuthon and Rolpa at the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, providing medical aid to those who need it.


    After spending seven years in the military, Middletown native Jesse Riggin will soon head off to medical school, but not before using his military experience and medical knowledge to help those in need in two remote villages in Nepal.

    As part of Rural Assistance Nepal, a not-for-profit charity organization that looks to advance education and assist with healthcare in the rural areas of Nepal, Riggin and his longtime friend, John, will spend three weeks in the villages of Pyuthon and Rolpa at the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, providing medical aid to those who need it.

    “All the medics that go to Nepal go to places of American interest like Mount Everest,” Riggin said. “Where we’re going has nothing to do with that, and these people are in dire need of doctors.”

    Riggin, who now resides in Warwick, Md., said he and John began planning the trip in early January. They will leave the United States Friday, July 8 and return home Friday, July 29.

    With assistance of the Chesapeake City United Methodist Charge, the men are currently looking to raise the $8,200 it will cost to travel to the country and additional funds for adequate medical supplies. They have set a $15,000 goal.

    “We thought this was a good fit with both of us having been in the military, being outdoor-oriented and having that yearning to go help people in need,” Riggin said.

    Aside from helping with everyday clinical procedures, such as emergency C-Sections or cleaning out wound infections, Riggin would also like to help build a small medical facility.

    “I can help you all I want, but if I leave and then am gone, nothing else happens,” he said. “But if I can help you build a little clinic that makes your life easier then that would be really good.”    

    Riggin said he would like to see this visit be the first of many to Nepal and possibly other countries in the future.

    He said often times when aid workers go into third-world countries, they don’t see the real needs of the people. He feels as though this trip will be different.

    You can’t go into it saying this is how I’m going to help you; you have to ask how can I help you,” he said. “If you try to force it, they don’t want it. You have to be very compassionate when you go into these places, and if you’re doing it for the wrong reasons, everyone sees it.”