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Middletown Transcript
  • Painter Katie Lillard presents ‘Revisiting Simultaneity’ exhibit

  • Injecting more color and personality into the world, one brushstroke at a time, local painter Katie Lillard’s new abstract art exhibit, “Revisiting Simultaneity,” is the aftermath of when fantasy ties the knot with reality.


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  • Injecting more color and personality into the world, one brushstroke at a time, local painter Katie Lillard’s new abstract art exhibit, “Revisiting Simultaneity,” is the aftermath of when fantasy ties the knot with reality.
    The exhibit, which runs through Friday, is on display at the Carvel State Office Building (in the building’s Delaware Arts Mezzanine Gallery in Wilmington.
    Lillard, 24, who currently lives in Philadelphia, Pa., shed light on her inspiration behind the exhibit, and more.       
    Q Why did you title this exhibit “Revisiting Simultaniety?” And what attracted you to this concept?
    A Simultaneity is not a new idea. Its root word is “simultaneous” which means "at the same time." This concept was explored by Robert Delaunay in the early 1900s. His paintings showed one place from many perspectives. Most artists strive to achieve the spirit of the subject in their work.
    Delaunay was interested in somehow conveying his subject's spirit in a more abstract beautification — one that showed a fuller range of emotion and feeling associated with the space and emotions that overlap each other that happen at the same time. My body of work aims toward a very similar goal, although my personal aesthetic is more ethereal and my subject is focused more inwardly. My paintings have less to do with the outside world, and more to do with my personal response to it.
    Q What mediums did you use for the exhibit?
    A Oil paint on linen and canvas, and graphite on paper. The graphite drawings are studies for the paintings. Pencil drawings develop faster, serving as a good study for a longer-term project. Oil paint allows for infinite layers. I love working in layers.
    Q Can you briefly walk us through the process of how you developed pieces for the exhibit?
    A My paintings all start different ways. But in every case, they are developed over time. I add a little to each piece when I see an opening for a new brush stroke, movement or breath.
    Q Your desire is for spectators to feel a range of emotions when observing your pieces. Since this exhibit displays abstract work, how’ve you communicated the mood of a joyful piece versus a somber one?
    A You can really do a lot with color and gesture, line weight, speed, etcetera. A brushstroke that gives the illusion of moving fast reads as excitement. Marry that speed with a bright color and you get elation. Want to calm it down? Simplify the space, take out the clutter and use more blue and white, light colors and pastels. A somber moment can be created with dark colors — thick heavy lines that create obstacles for the viewer to find their way around.
    Page 2 of 2 - Q What’s been a challenge for you in crafting abstract work in general?
    A Knowing when to stop.
    Q What do you enjoy about creating abstract work, as opposed to non-abstract pieces?
    A There are no restrictions in abstract work. Also, I really like how abstract art can communicate in an intuitive, nonverbal way. You can deliver the feeling you want directly.
    Q Typically, how do audiences respond to your abstract work, compared to your non-abstract pieces? And how does this make you feel?
    A Different strokes for different folks. Many times people can relate to both styles though.
     
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