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Middletown Transcript
  • National Night Out teaches NCCo residents health and safety tips

  • New Castle County based fire and EMS volunteers, County Police, State Police and several other agencies participated in the 29th annual event hosted by the New Castle County Police Citizen Advisory Council.


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  • Mill Creek Fire Company volunteer Kate Selner suited up.
    The 19-year-old put on more than 65 pounds of gear, including an oxygen tank, helmet, and all of the fire protective gear firefighters wear when they battle a blaze. 
    She wasn’t fighting a fire though.
    Selner was one of many emergency personnel at National Night Out at Glasgow Park Aug. 7 teaching residents about safety.
    New Castle County based fire and EMS volunteers, County Police, State Police and several other agencies participated in the 29th annual event hosted by the New Castle County Police Citizen Advisory Council.
    The event has drawn in more than 36 million people nationwide.
    The volunteers from Mill Creek Fire Company set up its fire safety house trailer, which kids can walk through and learn about what to do if their house catches fire.
    Senior volunteer firefighter Shawn Griner said that when the children get into the faux bedroom in the trailer, they set off the smoke detector and fill the room with artificial smoke.
    “We tell them how to get out,” Griner said. “Usually they point at the window first, but we tell them first to check the door.”
    The kids would then feel the door with the back of their hands.
    “Never touch the door with your palm, always the back of your hand,” he said. “And check it as high up as you can. If it’s hot, then use the secondary escape – the window.”
    The Fire Company has a window set up with a ladder that kids can climb out of the room of.
    They also encourage families to have a permanent meeting spot out of harms way.
    “That way if someone’s missing, we go into life mode,” Griner said. “Our priority then is to get anyone inside out of the house.”
    New Castle County Police also opened up its ‘bomb truck’ for the public to tour.
    Sgt. Brent Snyder displayed the bomb suit and the robot outside of the department’s explosive ordinance disposal vehicle and talked to people about firework safety.
    The department’s robot operates on a wireless system and can move its arm, he explained. It has cameras and an audio-visual system so that we can see and hear things.
    “It also is used in negotiations and with barricaded subjects for communications or if we need to send or retrieve items,” Snyder said.
    The bomb suit, which was on display next to the robot, is made from ballistic and deposit materials and is blast protected.
    With the helmet, it weighs close to 110 pounds.
    “It wears really well,” Snyder said.
    The suit its self can weight between 80 and 90 pounds and the helmet is an additional 10 to 20 pounds.
    Page 2 of 2 - The S.W.A.T. team also had its truck set up, showcasing its shields and gear.
    Besides human officers, Vasu, one of the New Castle County Police Department’s K-9’s was in attendance.
    Vasu, a 6-year-old German Shepard, lives and works with Cpl. Robert Vasecka.
    Originally, Vasu lived in Budapest, Hungary.
    “People go over and test dogs and bring them over when the police department needs them,” Vasecka said. “The county police selected a few and we picked [Vasu].”

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