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Middletown Transcript
  • Women ready to rock The Queen in 'Electric Ladyland'

  • Eye candy, ear candy and “rock” candy will be served by four charming frontwomen on Jan. 18 during the “Electric Ladyland” concert at World Café Live at the Queen.
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  • Eye candy, ear candy and "rock" candy will be served by four charming frontwomen on Jan. 18 during the "Electric Ladyland" concert at World Café Live at the Queen.
    The night will feature piano rocker Noelle Picara (Wilmington), rock-n-roll outfit Sylvan Wolfe (Wilmington), rock/soul and funk band Sweet Leda (Annapolis, Md.) and rock/soul outfit Lovebettie (Pittsburgh, Pa.).
    Christa Boeykens, 36, from Sylvan Wolfe, and Picara, 33, gave a snapshot of what guests can expect from them at the show, their views on frontwomen in today's music industry, and zombies.
    Q What does it mean to you to share the stage with three other frontwomen?
    Boeykens: It's super exciting. It's great to see other women in the rock genre.
    Picara: It's a huge honor to share the stage with them because they're such great musicians and have made a really good name for themselves.
    Q What do both of you bring to the show?
    Boeykens: Sylvan Wolfe brings the rock-n-roll.
    Picara: I'm kind of out there [laughs]. I've been performing in my shows in zombie makeup since August. I wrote this song "Zombie Girl" in spring and it transformed the way I see myself. I think there are many people who feel dead and they're walking around like zombies.
    Q So why do you dress up like a zombie?
    Picara: When people see me they're like whaaat?! But I actually feel a lot more natural like this. I'm really into performance art. I also really like the whole idea of putting together two things that are opposites. I make myself like really bloody, gruesome and wear a really fancy dress.
    Q You're going to wear fake blood and a fancy dress at Electric Ladyland?
    Noelle: Yep.
    Q Noelle will be performing "Zombie Girl" at Ladyland. Christa, what's one of the songs you'll be performing?
    Boeykens: I think our favorite song right now is "In the Sands." The song is about being in large crowded spaces and still feeling by yourself. The ironic thing is people want to be social and don't want to feel alone. But people like me are always surrounded by large groups and still feel alone.
    Page 2 of 2 - Q Is it fair to say women write songs from a different perspective than men?
    Picara: I'm very against gender stereotyping — that is a big part of my message as an artist, probably addressed most directly in my song "What's a Woman." Each person writes songs from his or her own individual perspective in the world and our personal experiences affect our voices as songwriters much more than whether or not we have boobs.
    Boeykens: I think some women for sure, obviously. But for me, personally, I don't.
    Q Since the last 10 years, do you think the musical landscape has seen a significant increase in bands fronted by women?
    Picara: No, I don't think there has been a significant increase in bands fronted by women.
    Boeykens: I think it might have changed a little, but it's still more male dominated. There's been growth over the years in alternative country and alternative rock. And there's a place for women in pop. In actual rock-n-roll and classic rock, however, I think it's still hard for a woman to break in.
    Q What do you think it'll take for this to change?
    Boeykens: There's definitely solid female singers that can rock. But if you look at women, there are more women in the pop field than rock-n-roll. I don't think women immediately draw to the rock side.
    Picara: I haven't encountered any resistance, and I don't think there's anything preventing female-fronted rock bands from being successful. The music industry is mostly made up of male musicians, and this is because a music career is an all-encompassing job and many women put their relationships and families first before their careers. So there are just not as many women musicians out there.
    IF YOU GO
    WHAT Electric Ladyland featuring Noelle Picara, Sylvan Wolfe, Sweet Leda and Lovebettie
    WHEN 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 18
    WHERE World Café Live at the Queen, 500 N. Market, St., Wilmington
    COST $11
    INFO worldcafelive.com or 994-1400
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