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Middletown Transcript
  • Middletown Councilman David Fisher tenders resignation

  • Middletown Councilman David Fisher has resigned from office effective immediately, setting up a May 15 special election to fill the remaining term of his office.
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  • Middletown Councilman David Fisher has resigned from office effective immediately, setting up a May 15 special election to fill the remaining term of his office.
    Middletown Mayor Kenneth Branner announced Fisher’s resignation Monday night, just minutes after releasing the results of the town’s annual municipal election.
    Fisher submitted his resignation Friday, nearly two months after the Middletown Transcript reported he had not been residing in town since October, although his legal address had not changed.
    Fisher was not present when the announcement was made and did not return phone calls seeking comment.
    However, the town did release a statement on his behalf, which Branner read to those who were at town hall to hear Monday’s election results.
    “Due to personal and private matters requiring my full focus and attention at this time, and to ensure the people of Middletown have the best possible representation, I have decided to resign my seat on the Town of Middletown Council,” he said in the statement. “It has been my pleasure and privilege to serve with Mayor and Council, the employees of the Town of Middletown, the Middletown Police Department and to represent the fine people of Middletown.”
    Branner declined to specify Monday whether Fisher submitted his resignation of his own accord or was asked to step down.
    Fisher's decision would seem to be an about-face from February when he said he had no plans to resign because his living situation soon would be resolved.
    “My legal address hasn’t changed and my responsibility to the town and its residents hasn’t changed,” he said last month. “I’ve attended all of the council meetings and as many functions as I could get to since this started and my intent is to continue serving the people of Middletown.”
    Middletown requires town council candidates to be residents of the town for at least one year prior to their election. However, the town charter does not address the issue of residency after a councilmember has been elected.
    When asked about Fisher’s residency in February, Town Solicitor Scott Chambers of the Dover-based law firm Schmittinger & Rodriguez said he was unfamiliar with the specifics and declined to comment further.
    Town spokeswoman Kristen Krenzer said the town had not received any formal complaints about the councilman’s residency that would necessitate a legal opinion on the matter.
    Branner said Middletown’s charter provides town council with the option of appointing someone to fill the remaining term of a vacant seat, or holding a special election.
    “My thought is that even though it’s a term for only eight or nine months that the people should be doing it,” he said. “I don’t like the idea of an appointment where it looks like we’re putting somebody in that’s one of ours, or however people might see it. It’s better that whoever wants to run, runs.”
    Page 2 of 2 - The candidate filing period for the special election will open at 8 a.m. on March 25 and close at 4:30 p.m. on April 16, he said.

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