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Middletown Transcript
  • Corbit-Calloway's MayFest in six short chapters

  • Corbit-Calloway Memorial Library has done a large spring fundraiser for years. This is only the second year for the current incarnation of MayFest, though. And, while every festival claims to “have something for everyone,” MayFest might actually live up to that.
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    • ALL THE DETAILS

      WHAT MayFest


      WHERE Corbit-Calloway Memorial Library, 115 High St.


      STREET-SIDE SALES 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.


      REGISTRATION TO SELL AT STREET-SIDE SALES $15 to $20


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      ALL THE DETAILS

      WHAT MayFest



      WHERE Corbit-Calloway Memorial Library, 115 High St.



      STREET-SIDE SALES 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.



      REGISTRATION TO SELL AT STREET-SIDE SALES $15 to $20



      PETTING ZOO 10 to 11 a.m.



      Live music with Crabmeat Thompson and Chuck Kuzminski 11 to 11:30 a.m.



      Pie-eating contests 11:30 a.m.



      Live music with Crabmeat Thompson and Chuck Kuzminski 12 to 12:30 p.m.



      MORE INFO (302) 378-8838 or corbitlibrary.org.

  • Corbit-Calloway Memorial Library has done a large spring fundraiser for years. This is only the second year for the current incarnation of MayFest, though. And, while every festival claims to “have something for everyone,” MayFest might actually live up to that.
    1. SALE TO END ALL SALES
    The block that Corbit-Calloway Memorial Library sits on between Front and Second Streets (on High St.) will be blocked off to make room for the massive yard, book, plant, craft, vendor and bake sale taking place all day. More than 40 participants are registered and Corbit-Calloway Executive Director Karen Quinn says that she’ll gladly accept more. Just call the library at (302) 378-8838 to reserve a spot for $15. Participants who need a table just pay $5 more.
    “It was big last year but this year, it’s massive,” she said. “I bought a cool antique mirror that I still love. I only spent $5 on it. I can’t wait to see what I find this year.”
    2. PIE FACE BECOMES A REALITY
    One of the highlights of last year’s MayFest was the pie-eating contest. Maybe it was all the pies or maybe it was that local school principals were competing. Several tried but only one could win: Townsend Elementary School Principal Don Davis, who’s coming back to defend his title against School Superintendent Matt Burrows, Assistant Superintent Sharon Pepuki, Appoquinimink High School Assistant Principal Suzanne Street and Cedar Lane Elementary Principal Melisa Stilwell.
    “Last year, I was nervous at first but once I saw all of the kids out there cheering, it was exciting,” Davis said. “I knew then that I’d come back and defend my title.”
    • SECOND HELPING “The pie-eating contest was such fun last year. It was a favorite of my seven-year-old boy, Tucker. Children and parents both loved seeing school principals and administrators battle it out,” said one of the MayFest organizers, Odessa resident Teddy Barnes. “This year, we are expanding to two competitions. One for school administrators and the other for teachers. I’m sure it will be one of the highlights.” (**NOTE: Pies donated by Bob Evans Restaurant)
    3. Live Music
    Delaware folk musician Crabmeat Thompson and CKuz Guitars owner Chuck Kuzminski will keep toes tapping during several scheduled shows with down-home music. Thompson is a fan of the library and has been excited for months about playing for the crowds.
    Fans of Crabmeat know him for regular gigs all over the region, including the Saint Georges Country Store but he’s traveled the country, playing music for crowds large and small. But, not everyone knows how he got his name.
    Page 2 of 2 - His name came about as a teen, when his friends designated him to toss three paper bags filled with seafood scraps into a roadside dumpster at Dewey Beach. The paper distingrated, covering him— and his one set of weekend getaway clothes— in the juice of many pounds of seafood and beer. At first, the name was a bit of a jeer from friends but, after toughing out the jokes, the name stuck.
    4. NEW & IMPROVED PLAY AREA
    This year, parents will be able to buy their children $5 wristbands for unlimited access to the play area where there will be all kinds of games and prizes. There will also be a moon bounce, lifesize book characters and a petting zoo.
    “We thought the wristband would make it easier for parents,” Quinn said. “We also thought it would be more fun for the kids. This way, they can play as many games and try for as many prizes as they want.”
    If the kiddos get hungry or thirsty, Quinn added that there will be plenty of refreshment options, from hot dogs to cotton candy.
    5. ADULTS CAN WIN PRIZES, TOO
    Unleash the kid inside with what Quinn describes as a “humongous raffle.”
    “We have some amazing raffle items that have generously donated,” she said. “There are gift cards to Cantwell’s, La Piazza, Blue Rocks games, the movies. You name it. We also this amazing booze basket and a beautiful Tory Burch tote bag.”
    Raffle tickets are $1 a piece or 6 for $5.
    6. ‘FIZZ, BOOM, READ’
    MayFest proceeds will benefit Corbit-Calloway’s summer reading program, which saw nearly 700 participating children last year. From June 1 through Aug. 30, kids can sign up for the program and set a reading goal. Once the kids get to their goals, the library rewards them with prizes and fanfare.
    “We really make a fuss and cause a scene when the kids come in with their completed logs,” Quinn explained. “Along the way, we also hold events and kid-friendly concerts for encouragement.”
    The first bit of encouragement will come in June when Rolie Polie Guacamole stops by to entertain the children. The kids then get two or three fun, interactive shows and events a week for the duration of the program.

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