In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, husband-and-wife-duo Ted and Christine Brooks-Corbett, owners of Historic Village Quilts in New Castle, are featuring more than a dozen vintage and reproduction quilts from the Civil War era, held at the New Castle Public Library.


In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, husband-and-wife-duo Ted and Christine Brooks-Corbett, owners of Historic Village Quilts in New Castle, are featuring more than a dozen vintage and reproduction quilts from the Civil War era, held at the New Castle Public Library.

The ongoing exhibit runs until Dec. 31.

IF YOU GO #1

WHAT Historic Village Quilts’ Civil War exhibit 

WHEN Through Dec. 31, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday and Tuesday; 2-9 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; closed Sunday. 

WHERE New Castle Public Library, 424 Delaware St., New Castle

COST Free

INFO Call New Castle Public Library at 328-4412

Christine (a longtime quilter who has a few of her own quilts on display at the exhibit) and Ted spoke with the Middletown Transcript on how quilts were used to help slaves escape, why they decided to host the event and more.

Q How did you get into quilting?
A Christine: I have been sewing for 50 years and this is an artistic venue for me, but it started with Barbie [dolls]. Barbie had a wardrobe that you would just die for. The quilt part came from a tradition in the northeast and this was like knitting; everybody did this. Every other house had a quilting bee. I went to a quilting bee and I said, “Oh, that’s it!”

Q What inspired you to host a quilting exhibit on the Civil War?
A Christine: Two reasons: I’m a huge advocate of Black history. I want people to know about Black history, and it started with that, and after I read “Hidden in Plain View” [by Jacqueline Tobin and Raymond Dobard]. Part of this is about my interest in symbolism, but it started with Black history. [During the Civil War era] there was a particular symbol [stitched in quilts] that would give a cue to the folks on the plantation to gather their tools; then there was another symbol that told them to approach the [getaway] wagon.

Q Explain how you came up with the design of your quilt, “Civil War Sampler”.
A Christine: There are a lot of things that are serious about it, but I had to have that folk art style. The stars and shield [located in the first row of the second column of the quilt] are, obviously, very common; and President Abraham Lincoln and his wife [Mary], [located in third row of the second column] are there; this is a happy couple getting married [in the first row of the first column]; and symbols of animals from the Bible and the tree of life [third row of first column]; and God is your anchor [second row of the second column]; the birds are the happiness sign [second row of third column].


IF YOU GO #2

WHAT ‘The Quilters’ Bunch’

WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 7  

WHERE New Castle Public Library, 424 Delaware St., New Castle

COST Free

INFO Call New Castle Public Library at 328-4412

Q How did you secure more than a dozen quilts for the exhibit?
A Ted: We do a call out for quilts and we put it in our own newsletter, and also some of the media we pay, and we’re just amazed at what comes in.

Q What can you tell us about your quilting event on Dec. 7?
A Ted: It’s called “The Quilters’ Bunch.”

A Christine:There are four of us that will talk about how we got interested in this, why did we choose this?, what’s so interesting about the Civil War?, symbols and sentiments of the Civil War (what was going on) and women on the home front.