This weekend, British and rebel troops will converge for a Revolutionary War encampment and reenactment this weekend at Mount Harmon Plantation in Earleville, Md., just over the state line.

This weekend, British and rebel troops will converge for a Revolutionary War encampment and reenactment this weekend at Mount Harmon Plantation in Earleville, Md., just over the state line.

The grounds of the plantation are overtaken by canvas tents making visitors will feel like they’ve stepped back in time, with hundreds of participants dressing up in authentic military wear.

”We expect over 1,000 reenactors from as far south as Puerto Rico and as far north as Canada, with large encampments of British and Continentals,” said Friends of Mount Harmon Executive Director Paige Howard. Last year, she said that many of the reenactors take their roles quite seriously. “A lot of these people see themselves as living history teachers.”

Like teachers, the actors will engage visitors with stories and discussions of what like was like during the war. However, unlike a classroom setting, these “teachers” are dressed in exquisitely in period costumes and go to great lengths to use vocabulary and dialogue that would have been overheard at war-siide camp sites.

“The uniforms really are a work of art. All the costumes are,” Howard said ahead of the 2013 event. “And, they’re everywhere you look. You’ll see formal and informal attire, depending on the role and we encourage visitors to interact with the actors and take advantage of what the festival offers.”

Both days of the festival will also feature a colonial marketplace full of authentic colonial crafts, apparel, food, pottery and housewares.

“Thousands and thousands of people annually flock to Williamsburg to see large-scale re-enactments like this one,” Howard explained. “But, instead of driving five hours, Middletown residents can take a short drive across the state line and experience one of the largest Revolutionary War re-enactments in the Mid-Atlantic region.” 

Hundreds of people attend as spectators so organizers plan activities than can engage every member of the family, even the ones who seem disinterested in history. For kids, there are colonial games and crafts. For adults, there are cooking demonstrations and manor house tours.