As we all know, conservatives have long been convinced that the mainstream media are biased in favor of Democrats in general and liberals in particular.


But that theory doesn’t hold up if you examine how the media are portraying the likely results of today’s midterm elections. Everywhere you turn, the conventional wisdom among the newspaper pundits and the talking heads on television is that Republicans probably will win control of the U.S. Senate and expand their majority in the U.S. House.


These foregone conclusions aren’t exactly calculated to spur greater turnout among Democratic voters. To the contrary, they’re more likely to discourage Democrats from participation.


Of course, it’s not impossible that election results will defy the predictions. After all, some pundits are saying that some of the key races are pretty close. But a Democratic surge is less likely when the consensus among the pundits and headline writers is that it won’t happen. Then, too, the widespread presumption of Republican gains can create a bandwagon effect that pushes previously undecided voters into the GOP fold.


The funny thing about all of this is that if Republicans fare as well as the pundits are predicting, that won’t bring an end to the right-wing complaints about the media’s liberal bias. To some people, cherished conspiracy theories are not easily shaken by evidence to the contrary.


 


 

As we all know, conservatives have long been convinced that the mainstream media are biased in favor of Democrats in general and liberals in particular.

But that theory doesn’t hold up if you examine how the media are portraying the likely results of today’s midterm elections. Everywhere you turn, the conventional wisdom among the newspaper pundits and the talking heads on television is that Republicans probably will win control of the U.S. Senate and expand their majority in the U.S. House.

These foregone conclusions aren’t exactly calculated to spur greater turnout among Democratic voters. To the contrary, they’re more likely to discourage Democrats from participation.

Of course, it’s not impossible that election results will defy the predictions. After all, some pundits are saying that some of the key races are pretty close. But a Democratic surge is less likely when the consensus among the pundits and headline writers is that it won’t happen. Then, too, the widespread presumption of Republican gains can create a bandwagon effect that pushes previously undecided voters into the GOP fold.

The funny thing about all of this is that if Republicans fare as well as the pundits are predicting, that won’t bring an end to the right-wing complaints about the media’s liberal bias. To some people, cherished conspiracy theories are not easily shaken by evidence to the contrary.