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Black History Month programs in Dover, Lewes

Delaware News Desk
Smyrna/Clayton Sun-Times
Smyrna/Clayton Sun-Times

Following the presentation at the Delaware Public Archives Feb. 1, more Black History Month programs by the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs are free and open to the public, unless noted.

• “The Summers Family: A Generational Story”

9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Feb. 8, The Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. African American History Month guided tours explore the true story of the manumission, or granting of freedom, of two slave children, Ruth and Thomas Summers, which took place in 1797 in the Kent County Recorder of Deeds office, located in what is now called The Old State House. The children were manumitted by their own father, James Summers, a free African American, who had obtained them from their former owner. 744-5054.

• “With Malice Toward None: Abraham Lincoln in Words and Pictures”

6 p.m. Feb. 12, The Old State House. Historian Dan Pritchett will discuss Lincoln’s love of language and his ability to use words to influence and inspire people and to transform the nation. Museum open 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 744-5054.

• “African Americans on the Eastern Shore”

2 p.m. Feb. 15, Lewes Public Library, 111 Adams Ave. Lecture by Jim Blackwell of the Seaford Museum exploring Eastern Shore history, slavery, the Ross family and Harriet Tubman. Free; reservations required by Feb. 14 to 645-1148.

• “The African American Experience in Delaware”

1 p.m. Feb. 15, The Old State House. Historic-site interpreter Dennis Fisher explores Delaware’s rich African American culture, history and legacy from the 18th to the 20th century. Museum open 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 744-5054.

• “The Women’s Suffrage Movement: Below the Color Line”

1 p.m. Feb. 22, The Old State House. African American History Month program by historian Syl Woolford explores the struggle for women to gain the right to vote and the role played by black women in the movement. Museum open 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 744-5054.

For more, visit history.delaware.gov.